Google on Tuesday launched a new mobile video calling application, Duo, which bridges the gap between Android and iOS systems.

Photo courtesy of Google.

Photo courtesy Google.

The company announced Duo alongside their proposed instant messaging application Allo (yet to be released) during Google I/O back in May. Developed locally at Google’s Kirkland campus, Duo is a simple 1-to-1 video calling program that works with your phone’s existing contact list.

Duo is Google’s answer to iOS’ Facetime video calling which requires an Apple ID and restricts users from calling Android devices. The new application is available on both platforms allowing users to chat regardless of their device’s operating system. However Android users will require version 4.1 or higher while iPhone users will need iOS 9 or higher to use the app.

Among U.S. adults, a scant 7 percent use mobile calling every day. This deficit may be due to the fact that 1 in 6 adults don’t use video calling because they perceive it to be rude according to a Google YouGov survey. With additional features like Knock Knock (which is turned on by default) a user can see live video of an incoming caller before they answer which makes the call feel less like an intrusion.

Moreover, Duo works with both Wi-Fi and cellular service and transitions between the two during a call if needed while scaling down to 2G on slower networks.

The application is available now from the platform’s respective app stores. Available to users across the globe and translated into 78 languages.