Photo courtesy Comprehensive Wealth Management

The first major purchase in Shilo Lockett’s life was an original Nintendo Game Boy with Tetris. 

In her youth, Lockett performed household chores for approximately one year to save up for the portable gaming system that was on the wish list of nearly every ’90s kid and, to this day, she can’t seem to part with it. 

“I literally cannot get rid of this Game Boy, because I have this very strong connection to the pride of what it took to get that thing,” the Bothell resident said. 

It was this strong work ethic that Lockett developed as a child that led her to her post today as president of Lynnwood-based Comprehensive Wealth Management. 

The company was started by Lockett’s father, who offered her a job at the firm following her graduation from Washington State University. But Lockett declined.

“Initially, out of college, I told him, ‘No. I need to know that I can stand on my own two feet.’ I didn’t want to just go work for Dad right out of college,” she said. 

Instead, Lockett entered the workforce, serving in the hospitality and marketing industry for boutique hotels and conference centers. 

Eventually, however, she was persuaded to join CWM, where she started as director of marketing; moved to chief operating officer; and, upon her dad’s retirement in 2014, became president. Nowadays, Lockett works to ensure clients are receiving the best advice and financial planning.

Back at home in Bothell, Lockett spends time with her two sons playing in parks, watching American Ninja Warrior while practicing their skills, and spending time with their newly adopted lab-mix puppy. 

Keep reading to see what a day looks like for this Tetris-loving company president.

Photos courtesy Shilo Lockett


6:30 a.m. | My alarm clock goes off, and I hit snooze once. My husband, Brian, is usually already up walking the dog, and I begin my daily ritual of waking the kiddos and feeding our cats.


7 a.m. | I bound back and forth between my own room and my boys’ (ages 4 and 8) to help keep them on track with their morning routines. It’s a bit of a whirlwind.


7:45 a.m. | Out the door. Brian and I (and Grammy a couple of days a week) take turns dropping the boys at school while the other heads into work. I’m thankful for having Brian as my partner at home and at the office.


9 a.m. | Either nibble on breakfast at my desk while I jump into my highest-priority items, or often participate in a project meeting with one of my team members.


10:30 a.m. | Any given day, I may be planning our next client event, reviewing marketing materials with the compliance team, or coordinating staff participation in a PAWS fundraising event.


Noon | I might attend a lunch meeting away from the office or take a few moments to walk and grab a bite before working through project tasks or emails. Thank goodness for the food truck that often sets up shop in our parking lot.


2:30 p.m. | Sitting is the new smoking and, especially since I don’t often take a real lunch break, I get up to stretch my legs and take a walk.


3 p.m. | I’m meeting with Morgan Arford, our chief investment officer, and financial advisor Marc Knauss. Since my schedule can get fairly booked, I try to make sure there’s a block each day for team members.


4 p.m. | We rotate turns picking up the boys from school and getting them to their after-school activities (thanks again, Grammy). Having flexibility with my schedule is key to balancing my business and my family.


6:30 p.m. | We make sure we are home for dinner with the boys unless there’s a specific after-hours, work-related activity. Sometimes dinner is made from scratch, and some nights, it’s pizza and a salad.


8:30 p.m. | This is one of my favorite times of day: story time. What once was short picture books has now evolved into chapter books, including some favorites from my own childhood.


9 p.m. | Brian and I tidy up from dinner and reset the house. At this point, one of us may need to log into work to finish up a few things or take care of household bills. Or we sit together to watch a show.